Chestnut

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    • #2845
      Daniel
      Participant

      How do  you all feel about Chestnut as a tone wood?

      I was visiting Etienne Vanhove’s shop to have him repair the pickguard on my mandolin and noticed a large chunk of it in the shop.  It’ll need to be trimmed and stacked, but it’s beautiful stuff.  Yellow like Maple, but without the green overtones.  Chestnut has blue overtones.

      I’m thinking fretboards maybe?  But like Maple and Walnut, a relative, it could be used for the body.

      Daniel


    • #2846
      Chrisakadigdog
      Participant

      I’ve Only seen it used as a binding or marquetry inlay on a few guitars from Japan, Yamaki,Yairi, Tokai,  Never as a back and sides tone wood use.      I could imagine it looking sharp as a combo three piece back for Mando or guitar.

    • #2847
      tadol
      Moderator

      Most chestnut seems to suffer from worms – hence “wormy chestnut” – may be primarily a US problem?  But it does (usually?) have a very pronounced grain – it’d be interesting to see one!

    • #2848
      Daniel
      Participant

      Etienne had a big piece of it.  Slab cut centre of a tree.  There were knots here and there, but nothing problematic.
      I’ll see if I can get a photos.

      Daniel  (candied chestnuts, yum)


    • #2856
      Matt Hayden
      Participant

      It’s good material, not particularly heavy, and nicely grained.

    • #3102
      Matt Hayden
      Participant

      And it makes great furniture.

    • #3110
      haasome
      Participant

      I was a builder for a good part of my life and think Chestnut is the perfect wood. Its strong, stiff, rot-resistant, durable, works easily and looks beautiful. Some 200+ year old homes have perfectly good underpinnings, even in our damp New England environment. However, Chestnut Trees suffer from the blight and no longer grow — at least American Chestnut doesn’t. I have many dozens of American Chestnut trees that continue to stump-shoot on my property. But then they all die when they reach ~20 feet tall, before they can produce seeds/nuts. Foresters and Biologists have been working long and hard to develop a blight-resistant strain with some promise. I had one American Chestnut tree grow tall enough to produce 2 nuts last year, but the tree died this year.

      I just read this article about genetic experiments that show promise, but people are concerned about the impact of genetically altering trees. I hope the link works for those interested — http://northamptondaily.ma.newsmemory.com/?publink=09625c7ca


      – Paul –

      • This reply was modified 1 year ago by haasome.
      • This reply was modified 1 year ago by haasome.
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